Category Archives: Development

Alternative Plyometric Exercises

I’ve incorporated plyometric exercises into my routine for a while now (explanation of plyometrics) and have come across some more. Like most of the exercises and workout routines posted here, they are focussed on developing the necessary muscles for martial arts:

    From the lunge position, jump up by driving your back leg to your chest
    Box jumps
    Bunny/frog hops (from low squat position to a tuck jump)
    Hop, skip and jump
    Clap push ups
    Alternating jumping lunges
    Push up and feet take off (like a horizontal star jump)
    From kneeling, jump into a squat position
    Push up into a squat (by tucking your knees right in)

Partner Workout Routine

Here’s a kickboxing style workout routine that takes about an hour to complete. It’s predominantly stretching and body-weight exercises. All you need is an open space and a kick shield (or focus pads):

Open park

Warm up
20 x star jumps
20 x side to side hops
20 x press ups
20 x burpees

Stretch
Rotate arms
Leg raises to the side and front
Static stretch arms (across the body and behind the back)
Side splits
Front splits

Exercise
For the length of a sports hall and back (or 100 metres):
Step forward lunge front kick
Step forward squat turning kick

In pairs (person A and person B), or it can include a third person to hold the pads and time:
A squat jumps B jab cross sprawl
Change after one minute
AB long jump burpees (one minute)
A turning kicks B splits/hamstring stretch
Change after one minute
AB bunny hops
A and B alternating turning kicks
AB plank
AB sprints (50m sprints, walk back and repeat 5 times)

Reactive sprint exercises

I heard of some new reactive speed exercises which I’m looking forward to trying out. They are varied sprint start positions:
1) Four point sprint start (like you’re starting from a running block)
2) Standing sprint start
3) Lying sprint start
4) Sudden change of direction

The same can be done for all of the above, but sprinting backwards.

Let me know how you get on.

DOMS (Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness)

Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) describes muscle soreness/stiffness that occurs 24 to 48 hours post-training.

DOMS creates microscopic tears of the muscle fibers. The amount of tearing (and soreness) depends on how hard and how long you exercise and what type of exercise you do. DOMS is most pronounced when you introduce a new training stimulus – a new activity, increased intensity or volume – or if you are new to physical activity in general.

“Your body is making adaptations to better prepare your muscles to do that activity again,” says Lauren Haythe, certified Kinesis Myofascial Integration Practitioner.

Yes, DOMS appears to be caused by trauma to your muscle fibers, but when muscles repair themselves, they get larger and stronger than before so that muscle soreness doesn’t happen (as severely) again.

NB: DOMS is not caused by the build-up of lactic acid.